Why Loud Sounds Are A Problem For People With Hearing Loss

✓ Evidence Based
Yvonne Doyle

Yvonne Doyle

Senior Hearing Aid Audiologist at Hidden Hearing
Ms Yvonne Doyle, Senior Hearing Aid Audiologist has been working with Hidden Hearing since 2011. Since joining Hidden Hearing, her Wexford Branch is recognised as a Centre of Excellence for hearing care in Ireland.

Ms Doyle won the 2017 'Irish Audiologist of the Year. The competition is organised by leading hearing aid battery manufacturer Rayovac, a division of Spectrum Brands Holdings Inc., who this year welcomed a new sponsor, The European Federation of Hard of Hearing People (EFHOH), on board, joining longstanding partners Audio Infos, and the European Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association (EHIMA).

Find Out More About Yvonne

Did you know that loud sounds can be very painful for people with hearing loss? It seems obvious that many people with hearing loss will struggle to hear quieter sounds or need to turn up the volume in order to hear, but many people with hearing loss find loud noises very difficult to cope with since their ears are very sensitive.

Here at Hidden Hearing, we understand that different environments can be challenging if you have hearing loss, including when you are wearing your hearing aids. Sudden loud noises, feedback from speakers and loud back-ground noise can all cause problems for hearing aid wearers, who may find that they cannot adjust their hearing aids to different environments in time, or that it is hard to find a satisfactory volume that makes the sounds bearable.

How Loud Can You Go?

Different sounds affect the ears in different ways and loud sounds can cause permanent damage to hearing. Whether you already wear hearing aids or are worried about hearing loss, it is very important to protect your ears from sudden loud noises and sustained high volumes.

The following guide may be useful:

30 decibels: Whispering
40 dB: A quiet room
50 dB: Moderate rainfall
60 dB: Normal conversation level, or appliances such as the dishwasher
70 dB: Standard household vacuum cleaner, or road traffic

All noises up to 70dB are regarded as safe to listen to for 24 hours or more.

80 – 90 dB: Food processor or blender, hairdryer, a motorbike passing

Sounds louder than 85 dB should be restricted to 8 hours or less, with the time limit decreasing by half for every 5 dB increase. For example, at 95 dB, the safe exposure limit would be 2 hours.

100 dB: A pneumatic drill or electric hand drill
110 dB: Top volume level of some MP3 players and mobile phones
120 dB: Jet plane taking off, emergency vehicle siren
130 dB: Jackhammer
140dB: Jet engine or gun shot
150 dB: Explosion or firework nearby

Sudden loud noises can cause permanent damage to hearing, and should be avoided wherever possible.

People who wear hearing aids may find that their ears are more sensitive to loud noises, and may prefer quieter rooms or find noisy environments difficult to cope with. Most digital hearing aids have different settings to cope with changing volumes and different types of noise, but these may be difficult to adjust at short notice.

Book a Free Hearing Test at Hidden Hearing

Hidden Hearing is Ireland’s leading private provider of hearing care solutions, and our national network includes over seventy-five branches and clinics. We offer free hearing tests and our experienced audiologists will help you to find the best solution for your lifestyle. Contact Hidden Hearing online today, or pop into your local branch.

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Why Loud Sounds Are A Problem For People With Hearing Loss
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Why Loud Sounds Are A Problem For People With Hearing Loss
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Did you know loud sounds can be very painful for people with hearing loss?It seems obvious that people with hearing loss will struggle to hear quiet sounds.
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Hidden Hearing
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This entry was posted in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss and tagged , , on by .
Yvonne Doyle

About Yvonne Doyle

Ms Yvonne Doyle, Senior Hearing Aid Audiologist has been working with Hidden Hearing since 2011. Since joining Hidden Hearing, her Wexford Branch is recognised as a Centre of Excellence for hearing care in Ireland. Ms Doyle won the 2017 'Irish Audiologist of the Year. The competition is organised by leading hearing aid battery manufacturer Rayovac, a division of Spectrum Brands Holdings Inc., who this year welcomed a new sponsor, The European Federation of Hard of Hearing People (EFHOH), on board, joining longstanding partners Audio Infos, and the European Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association (EHIMA). Find Out More About Yvonne

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